Nutritional and Toxicological Aspects of Food Safety

  • Mendel Friedman

Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 177)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xii
  2. Mendel Friedman
    Pages 31-63
  3. David L. Brandon
    Pages 65-90
  4. David L. Berry, C. Tucker Helmes
    Pages 91-113
  5. T. K. Smith, M. S. Carson
    Pages 153-167
  6. Stanley T. Omaye
    Pages 169-203
  7. Calvin C. Willhite, Vergil H. Ferm
    Pages 205-228
  8. William Gaffield, Richard F. Keeler
    Pages 241-251
  9. A. L. Livingston, B. E. Knuckles, L. R. Teuber, O. B. Hesterman, L. S. Tsai
    Pages 253-268
  10. Joseph H. Hotchkiss
    Pages 287-298
  11. Daniel Gallaher, Barbara O. Schneeman
    Pages 299-320
  12. Gregory Pearce, James McGinnis, Clarence A. Ryan
    Pages 321-332
  13. Mendel Friedman, Michael R. Gumbmann, Patricia M. Masters
    Pages 367-412

About this book

Introduction

Naturally occurring antinutrients and food toxicants, and those formed during food processing, adversely affect the nutri­ tional quality and safety of foods. Because of the need to improve food quality and safety by plant breeding, fortification with appropriate nutrients, and processing methods, and because of the growing concern about possible direct relationships between diet and diseases, research is needed to: (1) evaluate the nutritive quality and safety of crops and fortified, supplemented, and processed foods; (2) define conditions that favor or minimize the formation of nutritionally antagonistic and toxic compounds in foods; and (3) define the toxicology, metabolism, and mechanisms of the action of food ingredients and their metabolites. As scientists interested in improving the safety of the food supply, we are challenged to respond to the general need for exploring: (1) possible adverse consequences of antinutrients and food toxicants; and (2) factors which contribute to the formation and inactivation of undesirable compounds in foods. Medical research offers an excellent analogy. Studies on causes and mechanisms of disease processes are nearly always accompanied by parallel studies on preventive measures and cures. Such an approach offers the greatest possible benefits to the public.

Keywords

chemistry enzyme membrane metabolism nutrition plant protein toxicology

Editors and affiliations

  • Mendel Friedman
    • 1
  1. 1.Agricultural Research Service Western Regional Research CenterU.S. Department of AgricultureBerkeleyUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-4790-3
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag US 1984
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4684-4792-7
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4684-4790-3
  • Series Print ISSN 0065-2598
  • About this book