Advertisement

Nutritional Studies of a Carboxypeptidase Inhibitor from Potato Tubers

  • Gregory Pearce
  • James McGinnis
  • Clarence A. Ryan
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 177)

Abstract

Carboxypeptidase inhibitor from potato tubers was fed to newly hatched chicks at a level equal to that present in diet containing 50% raw potato, which caused severe growth depression and 20% mortality. At this level the effects of the inhibitor on growth was small but the following effects were noted: (a) increased fecal protein (the increase mainly consisting of low molecular weight proteins); (b) poorer feed efficiency; and (c) a significant decrease in pancreatic digestive proenzyme levels, although no hypertrophy was noted. In addition, the inhibitor was not digested readily in the intestinal tract and it increased in concentration in intestinal contents as it progressed down the tract. Potato Inhibitor II, a potent trypsin inhibitor, when fed to chicks, also at the level found in a 50% raw potato diet, was severely growth depressing. It significantly increased fecal protein and caused pancreatic hypertrophy. The trypsin inhibitor may be a major growth depressing agent in raw potatoes whereas the carboxypeptidase inhibitor probably contributes little to the growth depression.

Keywords

Potato Tuber Trypsin Inhibitor Feed Efficiency Russet Burbank Potato Chick Diet 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Melville JC, Ryan CA. Chymotrypsin Inhibitor I from potatoes. J Biol Chem 247: 3445–3453, 1972.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bryant J, Green TB, Gurusaddaiah T, Ryan CA. Proteinase Inhibitor II from potatoes: isolation and characterization of its protomer compounds. Biochemistry 15: 3418–3424, 1976.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ryan CA, Hass GM, Kuhn RW. Purification and characterization of a carboxypeptidase inhibitor from potatoes. J Biol Chem 249: 5495–5499, 1974.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Pearce G, Sy L, Russel C, Ryan CA, Hass GM. Isolation and characterization from potato tubers of two polypeptide inhibitors of serine proteinases. Arch Biochem Biophys 13: 456–462, 1982.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Pearce G, McGinnis J, Ryan CA. Utilization by chicks of half-cystine from native and denatured proteinase inhibitor protein from potatoes. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 160: 180–184, 1979.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Huang DY, Swanson BG, Ryan CA. Stability of proteinase inhibitors in potato tubers during cooking. J Food Sci 46: 287–290, 1981.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Ryan CA, Kuo T, Pearce G, Kunkel R. Variability in the concentration of three heat stable proteinase inhibitor proteins in potato tubers. Am Potato J 53: 443–455, 1976.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Panyim S, Chalkley R. High resolution acrylamide gel electrophoresis of histones. Arch Biochem Biophys 130: 337–346, 1969.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Hass GM, Ryan CA. Carboxypeptidase inhibitor from potato. In: Lorand L, ed. Methods in Enzymology. Academic Press, New York, Vol 80:p778, 1981.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gregory Pearce
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • James McGinnis
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Clarence A. Ryan
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Biological ChemistryWashington State UniversityPullmanUSA
  2. 2.Biochemistry/Biophysics ProgramWashington State UniversityPullmanUSA
  3. 3.Program in NutritionWashington State UniversityPullmanUSA

Personalised recommendations