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Cholinergic Effects of HI-6 in Soman Poisoning

  • T.-M. Shih
  • C. E. Whalley
  • J. J. Valdes
  • P. M. Lundy
  • P. A. Lockwood
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 30)

Abstract

During the past decade considerable advances have been made in the development of therapeutic antidotes against organophosphorus cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitors. Poisoning with most organophosphorus anticholinesterases (AntiChE) is treatable with a combination of an antimuscarinic compound, such as atropine sulfate (ATS), and an oxime, such as pralidoxime chloride (2-PAM) or toxogonin (18, 30, 34). The antidotal effects of oximes are generally thought to be due to their ability to reactivate the inhibited cholinesterase enzyme (10, 25, 26); however, a part of their beneficial effect has been ascribed to actions other than enzyme reactivation (4, 35, 41). Since most of the useful oximes are quaternary in structure and do not readily cross the blood brain barrier, the role played by the oximes in the central nervous system (CNS) is in some doubt (3, 25, 52). Although small quantities of these oximes do enter the central nervous system, the degree of reactivation of brain ChE is not great (11, 15).

Keywords

Protective Ratio Quinuclidinyl Benzilate Atropine Methylnitrate Antidotal Treatment Discrete Brain Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • T.-M. Shih
    • 1
  • C. E. Whalley
    • 1
  • J. J. Valdes
    • 2
  • P. M. Lundy
    • 3
  • P. A. Lockwood
    • 4
  1. 1.Basic Pharmacology BranchU.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical DefenseUSA
  2. 2.Toxicology BranchChemical Research and Development CenterAberdeen Proving GroundUSA
  3. 3.BiomedicalDefense Research Establishment SuffieldRalstonCanada
  4. 4.Chemistry SectionsDefense Research Establishment SuffieldRalstonCanada

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