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Intertribal somatic hybridization between rapid cycling Brassica oleracea L. and Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz

Abstract

Black spot, caused by Alternaria brassicae and A. brassicicola, is an important disease in all Brassica oleracea vegetables. Sufficient resistance to the pathogen is not found within the species, nor in species that readily cross to B. oleracea. Camelina sativa (false flax) is highly resistant to Alternaria spp. and has, in addition, other desirable characters for the improvement of B. oleracea. Protoplast fusions were performed between rapid cycling B. oleracea (tribe Brassiceae), which has good regenerability, and C. sativa (tribe Sisymbrieae) by polyethylene glycol (PEG) treatment. The B. oleracea fusion partner was inactivated by treatment with iodoacetate. C. sativa has poor regenerability; hence, no pretreatment was needed for this species. The protoplasts were cultured using a feeder layer system. A total of 2903 calli were isolated from the fusions. Fourteen of these initiated shoots, i.e., 0.5% regeneration frequency. Approximately 110 shoots were excised from 6 of these calli and transferred to rooting medium. Rooted plantlets grew vigorously in vitro and flowering was frequently observed. However, establishment of rooted shoots in soil was unsuccessful. Hybrid identity was confirmed by intermediate shoot morphology, RAPD marker analysis, and flow cytometric estimation of nuclear DNA content.

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Hansen, L.N. Intertribal somatic hybridization between rapid cycling Brassica oleracea L. and Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz. Euphytica 104, 173–179 (1998). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1018604919488

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  • Alternaria
  • black spot
  • Brassica oleracea
  • Camelina sativa
  • disease resistance
  • false flax
  • protoplast fusion