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Brazilian Journal of Botany

, Volume 40, Issue 2, pp 371–377 | Cite as

Characterization of a Triticum aestivumDasypyrum villosum T1VS·6BL translocation line and its effect on wheat quality

  • Mingxing Wen
  • Yigao Feng
  • Juan Chen
  • Tongde Bie
  • Yuhui Fang
  • Dongsheng Li
  • Xiaolin Wen
  • Aida Chen
  • Jinhua Cai
  • Ruiqi Zhang
Original Article
  • 139 Downloads

Abstract

Bread wheat quality is mainly correlated with protein quality, particularly the glutenin content and high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) of grain endosperm. The number of HMW-GS alleles and loci are limited in bread wheat cultivars, though ideally, a large amount of HMW-GS alleles in wheat-related grasses should be exploited. In this study, a novel wheat-Dasypyrum villosum GP005 translocation line, NAU425, carrying a pair of T1VS·6BL translocation chromosomes was developed and assessed via molecular cytogenetic analysis. Grain quality analysis indicated that NAU425 has a positive effect on protein content, Zeleny sedimentation value, wet gluten content, and the rheological characteristics of wheat flour dough compared to the same qualities of recurrent parent ‘Chinese Spring’ attributed to the additional HMW-GS donated by 1VS of D. villosum. The protein content of T1VS·6BL was significantly improved compared to ‘Chinese Spring’ likely owing to the dramatic increase in glutenin content. Considering the importance of glutenin content for bread wheat end-use quality, and T1VS·6BL line with good plant vigor, full fertility and cytogenetic stability, NAU425 may be valuable in bread wheat quality improvement. Our results presented here may provide an approach to improve bread wheat quality through additional alien HMW-GS introgression.

Keywords

Dasypyrum villosum Grain quality T1VS·6BL translocation line 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank Dr. Zhongwei Tian of the College of Agronomy, Nanjing Agricultural University, China, Nanjing, for quality evaluation. This study was sponsored by the Special Fund for Independent Innovation of Agricultural Science and Technology in Jiangsu, China (No. CX(14)5082) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (30871519, 31471497, 31101142).

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Copyright information

© Botanical Society of Sao Paulo 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mingxing Wen
    • 1
  • Yigao Feng
    • 2
  • Juan Chen
    • 2
  • Tongde Bie
    • 3
  • Yuhui Fang
    • 4
  • Dongsheng Li
    • 1
  • Xiaolin Wen
    • 1
  • Aida Chen
    • 1
  • Jinhua Cai
    • 1
  • Ruiqi Zhang
    • 2
  1. 1.Zhenjiang Academy of Agricultural SciencesJurongChina
  2. 2.College of AgronomyNanjing Agricultural University/National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Germplasm Enhancement/JCIC-MCPNanjingChina
  3. 3.Yangzhou Academy of Agricultural SciencesYangzhouChina
  4. 4.Wheat Research InstituteHenan Academy of Agricultural SciencesZhengzhouChina

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