Oecologia

, Volume 175, Issue 1, pp 209–218

Effects of subsidy quality on reciprocal subsidies: how leaf litter species changes frog biomass export

  • Julia E. Earl
  • Paula O. Castello
  • Kara E. Cohagen
  • Raymond D. Semlitsch
Community ecology - Original research

DOI: 10.1007/s00442-013-2870-x

Cite this article as:
Earl, J.E., Castello, P.O., Cohagen, K.E. et al. Oecologia (2014) 175: 209. doi:10.1007/s00442-013-2870-x

Abstract

Spatial subsidies are resources transferred from one ecosystem to another and which can greatly affect recipient systems. Increased subsidy quantity is known to increase these effects, but subsidy quality is likely also important. We examined the effects of leaf litter quality (varying in nutrient and tannin content) in pond mesocosms on gray treefrog (Hyla versicolor) biomass export, as well as water quality and ecosystem processes. We used litter from three different tree species native to Missouri [white oak (Quercus alba), northern red oak (Quercus rubra), and sugar maple (Acer saccharum)], one non-native tree [white pine (Pinus strobus)], and a common aquatic grass [prairie cordgrass (Spartina pectinata)]. We found that leaf litter species affected almost every variable we measured. Gray treefrog biomass export was greatest in mesocosms with grass litter and lowest with white oak litter. Differences in biomass export were affected by high tannin concentrations (or possibly the correlated variable, dissolved oxygen) via their effects on survival, and by primary production, which altered mean body mass. Effects of litter species could often be traced back to the characteristics of the litter itself: leaf nitrogen, phosphorus, and tannin content, which highlights the importance of plant functional traits in affecting aquatic ecosystems. This work and others stress that changes in forest species composition could greatly influence aquatic systems and aquatic–terrestrial linkages.

Keywords

Leaf litter Tannins Allochthonous Detritus Amphibian larvae 

Supplementary material

442_2013_2870_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (84 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 83 kb)
442_2013_2870_MOESM2_ESM.pdf (135 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (PDF 134 kb)
442_2013_2870_MOESM3_ESM.pdf (93 kb)
Supplementary material 3 (PDF 93 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julia E. Earl
    • 1
  • Paula O. Castello
    • 2
  • Kara E. Cohagen
    • 2
  • Raymond D. Semlitsch
    • 2
  1. 1.National Institute for Mathematical and Biological SynthesisUniversity of TennesseeKnoxvilleUSA
  2. 2.Division of Biological SciencesUniversity of MissouriColumbiaUSA

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