AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 11, Supplement 2, pp 101–115

Housing Need, Housing Assistance, and Connection to HIV Medical Care

Authors

    • Department of Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public HealthColumbia University
  • Gunjeong Lee
    • Department of Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public HealthColumbia University
  • David M. Abramson
    • National Center for Disaster Preparedness, Mailman School of Public HealthColumbia University
  • Peter Messeri
    • Department of Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public HealthColumbia University
  • Anne Siegler
    • Heilbrunn Department for Population and Family Health, Mailman School of Public HealthColumbia University
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-007-9276-x

Cite this article as:
Aidala, A.A., Lee, G., Abramson, D.M. et al. AIDS Behav (2007) 11: 101. doi:10.1007/s10461-007-9276-x

Abstract

HIV infection has become a chronic condition that for most persons can be effectively managed with regular monitoring and appropriate medical care. However, many HIV positive persons remain unconnected to medical care or have less optimal patterns of health care utilization than recommended by good clinical practice standards. This paper investigates housing status as a contextual factor affecting access and maintenance in appropriate HIV medical care. Data provided from 5,881 interviews conducted from 1994 to 2006 with a representative sample of 1,661 persons living with HIV/AIDS in New York City demonstrated a strong and consistent relationship between housing need and remaining outside of or marginal to HIV medical care. In contrast, housing assistance increased access and retention in medical care and appropriate treatment. The relationship between housing and medical care outcomes remain controlling for client demographics, health status, insurance coverage, co-occurring mental illness, and problem drug use and the receipt of supportive services to address co-occurring conditions. Findings provide strong evidence that housing needs are a significant barrier to consistent, appropriate HIV medical care, and that receipt of housing assistance has an independent, direct impact on improved medical care outcomes.

Keywords

HousingHomelessnessHIV/AIDSMedical careSocioeconomic factors

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007