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Immunoglobulin Diversity

Regulation of Expression of Immunoglobulin Genes during Primary Development of B Cells
  • Alexander R. Lawton
  • John F. Kearney
  • Max D. Cooper
Part of the Biological Regulation and Development book series (BRD, volume 2)

Abstract

Since it was perceived that the capacity of immunoglobulin molecules to bind specifically to antigenic determinants was determined by their amino acid sequences, and therefore represented genetic information, there have been impressive attempts to clarify the problem of how the immense diversity of genes coding for antibody molecules of different specificities might be generated. Approaches to the question of generation of diversity have been largely based on comparative analysis of the amino acid sequences of the immunoglobulin molecules derived from plasma cell tumors of mice and humans. These studies have provided fundamental information on the nature of the structural genes that code for immunoglobulin molecules, have given insights into their evolution, and have defined constraints within which models for the generation of diversity must be fitted (Hood et al., 1977 b).

Keywords

Cold Spring Harbor Fetal Liver Clonal Diversity Immunoglobulin Gene Immunoglobulin Class 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexander R. Lawton
    • 1
    • 2
  • John F. Kearney
    • 1
    • 2
  • Max D. Cooper
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Pediatrics and MicrobiologyThe Cellular Immunology Unit of the Tumor InstituteBirminghamUSA
  2. 2.Comprehensive Cancer CenterUniversity of Alabama in BirminghamBirminghamUSA

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