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Neuronal Transport of Trace Amines: An Overview

  • L. E. Dyck

Abstract

Recently, it has been shown that uptake of radiolabeled meta-tyramine (mTA) or para-tyramine (pTA) into slices of rat hypothalamus and striatum was very similar to that of dopamine (DA). The uptake of all three amines could be resolved into a high affinity, as well as a low affinity, uptake system. The high affinity uptakes of mTA and pTA into the striatum were sodium dependent, were decreased by lesioning of the substantia nigra or medial forebrain bundle, and by the presence of cocaine, ouabain or dinitrophenol. In addition, a depolarizing stimulus caused the Ca++-dependent release of radiolabelled, as well as endogenous, mTA and pTA from rat slices. The characteristics of mTA and pTA uptake and release are those that have been associated with a neurotransmitter function; however, it appears that the release of mTA and pTA can originate from a different neuronal compartment than DA release. In keeping with this, it has been observed that two different types of drugs -- the methylphenidate-like CNS stimulants and dipropyl-substituted aminotetralins -- stimulate the release of mTA and pTA but not DA. It seems possible that alterations in the intraneuronal compartmentation of mTA and pTA may affect the quantity of catecholamine release and may also affect the nature of the post-synaptic response.

Keywords

Nerve Terminal Caudate Nucleus Medial Forebrain Bundle Chromaffin Granule Striatal Slice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Humana Press Inc. 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. E. Dyck
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychiatric Research Division, Cancer and Medical Research BuildingUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada

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