Polymorphism of Microsatellite Sequence within Protein Kinase ORFs in Phytopathogenic Fungus, Magnaporthe Grisea

  • Chengyun Li
  • Lin Liu
  • Jing Yang
  • Jinbin Li
  • Zhang Yue
  • Yunyue Wang
  • Yong Xie
  • Youyong Zhu
Part of the The International Federation for Information Processing book series (IFIPAICT, volume 258)

Eighteen polymorphic microsatellite markers suitable for population genetic studies and protein kinase encoding genic variation measurement were developed for rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea. Polymorphism was evaluated by using 46 isolates collected from diverse geographical locations and rice varieties. Preliminary results indicate that each locus harbors two to fourteen alleles.

Keywords

Magnaporthe grisea protein kinase microsatellite 

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Copyright information

© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chengyun Li
    • 1
  • Lin Liu
    • 1
  • Jing Yang
    • 1
  • Jinbin Li
    • 2
  • Zhang Yue
    • 1
  • Yunyue Wang
    • 1
  • Yong Xie
    • 1
  • Youyong Zhu
    • 1
  1. 1.Plant Protection CollegeYunnan Agricultural UniversityChina
  2. 2.Plant Protection Research Institute of Yunnan Academy of Agricultural SciencesKunmingChina

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