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  • Book
  • © 2018

Remembering and Forgetting in the Digital Age

  • Challenges long-established but questionable principles of data protection law that are unfit for the digital age

  • Covers topics of remembering and forgetting, data protection and privacy from a holistic, future-oriented and interdisciplinary approach

  • Analyzes the present legal framework with a view to shaping future legislation, considering how legislators and rule-makers should approach today’s data

Part of the book series: Law, Governance and Technology Series (LGTS, volume 38)

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eBook USD 89.00
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  • ISBN: 978-3-319-90230-2
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
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  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book USD 119.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book USD 169.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

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Table of contents (18 chapters)

  1. Front Matter

    Pages i-xvi
  2. Part I Introduction

    • Florent Thouvenin, Peter Hettich, Herbert Burkert, Urs Gasser
    Pages 1-14
  3. Part II Normative Concepts of Information Management

    • Florent Thouvenin, Peter Hettich, Herbert Burkert, Urs Gasser
    Pages 15-55
  4. Technological Developments

    1. Front Matter

      Pages 56-56
    2. 1 Introduction

      • Florent Thouvenin, Peter Hettich, Herbert Burkert, Urs Gasser
      Pages 57-58
    3. 2 Search Engines

      • Florent Thouvenin, Peter Hettich, Herbert Burkert, Urs Gasser
      Pages 59-71
    4. 3 Remembering and Forgetting in Social Media

      • Florent Thouvenin, Peter Hettich, Herbert Burkert, Urs Gasser
      Pages 72-83
    5. 4 Web Archives

      • Florent Thouvenin, Peter Hettich, Herbert Burkert, Urs Gasser
      Pages 84-101
    6. 5 Mobile Internet

      • Florent Thouvenin, Peter Hettich, Herbert Burkert, Urs Gasser
      Pages 102-113

About this book

This book examines the fundamental question of how legislators and other rule-makers should handle remembering and forgetting information (especially personally identifiable information) in the digital age. It encompasses such topics as data protection, collective memory, privacy and the right to be forgotten when considering data storage and deletion. The authors argue in support of maintaining the new digital default, that (personally identifiable) information should be remembered rather than forgotten. 

The book offers guidelines for legislators as well as private and public organizations on how to make decisions on remembering and forgetting personally identifiable information in the digital age. It draws on three main perspectives: law, including the example of Swiss legal provisions; technology, specifically search engines, internet archives, social media and the mobile internet; and an interdisciplinary perspective from philosophy, the social sciences and archiving science among other disciplines. Readers will benefit from a holistic view of the informational phenomenon of “remembering and forgetting”.

This book will appeal to economists, lawyers, philosophers, sociologists, historians, anthropologists, and psychologists among many others. Such wide appeal is due to its rich and interdisciplinary approach to the challenges for individuals and society at large with regard to this aspect of human experience in the digital age. 

Keywords

  • Right to be Forgotten
  • Data Protection
  • Data Privacy
  • Collective Memory
  • Remembering and Forgetting
  • Data Storage and Deletion
  • Digital Archives
  • Information Management
  • Informational Self Determination
  • Social and Cultural Identity

Authors and Affiliations

  • University of Zurich , Zurich, Switzerland

    Florent Thouvenin

  • University of St. Gallen, St. Gallen, Switzerland

    Peter Hettich, Herbert Burkert

  • Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA

    Urs Gasser

About the authors

Prof. Dr. Florent Thouvenin is an Associate Professor of Information and Communications Law at the University of Zurich. He is the co-founder and co-chair of the Executive Committee of the Center for Information Technology, Society, and Law (ITSL) at the University of Zurich and the Executive Director of the Swiss Forum of Communication Law (SF-FS). 

Prof. Dr. Herbert Burkert is a Steering Committee Member of the Digital Asia Hub and President of the Research Center for Information Law at the University of St. Gallen (Switzerland) where he taught public law as well as information and communication law. His research interests include law as Information and its role in regulating information flows in society, information technology as object and driver of regulation, and data protection and access to information regimes.

Prof. Dr. Urs Gasser is the Executive Director of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University and a Professor of Practice at Harvard Law School. He is a visiting professor at KEIO University (Japan) and also teaches at Fudan University School of Management (China). Urs Gasser’s research and teaching activities focus on information law, policy, and society issues. 

Prof. Dr. Peter Hettich is Professor of Public Law at the University of St. Gallen where he also serves as a Director of the Institute of Public Finance, Fiscal Law and Law and Economics. His research interests include constitutional protections of economic freedoms and regulated markets, administrative law, competition law, construction and environmental law, infrastructure regulation and the law of public companies. He acts as Of Counsel to the Swiss law firm VISCHER in Zurich.

Bibliographic Information

Buying options

eBook USD 89.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-3-319-90230-2
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book USD 119.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book USD 169.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)