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Issues associated with the use of modified texture foods

Abstract

Use of modified texture foods (MTF) is common in the geriatric population. There is a potential for increased prevalence of use of MTF due in part to longer survival of persons with dementia, those who have suffered from a stroke, as well as other degenerative diseases that affect chewing and swallowing. Unfortunately, little clinical, nutritional and sensory research has been conducted on MTF to inform practice. This review highlights issues identified in the literature to date that influence nutritional and sensory quality and acceptability of these foods. Use of MTF is highly associated with undernutrition, however causality is difficult to demonstrate due to confounding factors such as the requirement for feeding assistance. Knowledge gaps and considerations that need to be taken into account when conducting research are identified.

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Keller, H., Chambers, L., Niezgoda, H. et al. Issues associated with the use of modified texture foods. J Nutr Health Aging 16, 195–200 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12603-011-0160-z

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12603-011-0160-z

Key words

  • Modified texture food
  • undernutrition
  • pureed