Students and teachers mobilizing mathematical concepts through reciprocal noticing

Abstract

This article elaborates a theoretical, methodological, and analytical approach intended to highlight the materiality and reciprocity of noticing in mathematics classrooms. Drawing from highly resonant concepts from materialism and Indigenous Knowledges—two perspectives that researchers rarely bring into dialogue—this alternative approach explores the reciprocal, material, and more-than-human nature of noticing. By focusing on the role of movement in noticing, the approach discusses the indivisibility of sensing and making sense as students and teachers mobilize mathematical concepts. Applying this approach in a non-traditional analysis of two classroom episodes, the paper provides a discussion centered on what noticing looks like when humans are decentered, concepts are mobilized, and sensing meets making sense.

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Acknowledgements

This article is based on research supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) under Grant no. 1253822. Any findings, claims, or recommendations included in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of NSF.

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Correspondence to Higinio Dominguez.

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Dominguez, H. Students and teachers mobilizing mathematical concepts through reciprocal noticing. ZDM Mathematics Education (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11858-020-01209-y

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