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Euphytica

, 170:15 | Cite as

Wild Lactuca germplasm for lettuce breeding: current status, gaps and challenges

  • Aleš Lebeda
  • Ivana Doležalová
  • Eva Křístková
  • Miloslav Kitner
  • Irena Petrželová
  • Barbora Mieslerová
  • Alžběta Novotná
Article

Abstract

In this review, we present a critical analysis of the current status of wild Lactuca L. germplasm in relation to its utility for lettuce breeding. We discuss wild Lactuca germplasm in ex situ collections from the perspectives of taxonomy, biogeography, biology and ecology, gene pools, field exploration and acquisition, descriptor development, characterization and evaluation, and enhancement. Future research and other activities related to wild Lactuca germplasm and their continued exploitation in lettuce breeding are considered.

Keywords

Taxonomy Biogeography Ecology Gene pools Collecting Gene banks Duplicates Descriptors Genetic diversity Phenology DNA content Disease resistance Biochemical features Molecular polymorphism 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Critical reading and valuable remarks by Dr. M. P. Widrlechner (USDA-ARS, Iowa State University, North Central Regional Plant Introduction Station, Ames, Iowa, USA) are gratefully acknowledged. The research was supported by grant MSM 6198959215 (Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aleš Lebeda
    • 1
  • Ivana Doležalová
    • 1
  • Eva Křístková
    • 1
  • Miloslav Kitner
    • 1
  • Irena Petrželová
    • 1
  • Barbora Mieslerová
    • 1
  • Alžběta Novotná
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Science, Department of BotanyPalacký University in OlomoucOlomouc-HoliceCzech Republic

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