Journal of Applied Phycology

, Volume 6, Issue 2, pp 131–141 | Cite as

Microalgal feeds for aquaculture

  • Raymond M. Gladue
  • John E. Maxey
Article

Abstract

The concurrent trends of increasing consumption of seafood and decreasing natural harvests will dictate that a larger portion of seafood must be derived from aquaculture in the 21st century. The difficulty of producing economically large quantities of microalgal feeds is currently one of the major impediments to the further development of the aquaculture industry. Traditional methods, which rely on photosynthetic growth in outdoor ponds or indoors under artificial lights, suffer from the phenomenon of light-limitation of biomass density. Certain species of microalgae are capable of heterotrophic growth to high density utilizing sugars or other organic compounds for energy and cell carbon. This paper reviews work with strains of heterotrophic algae that have demonstrated potential as both nutritional feeds and for economical production by fermentation.

Key words

aquaculture Chlorella Cyclotella heterotrophy microalgae Tetraselmis 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond M. Gladue
    • 1
  • John E. Maxey
    • 1
  1. 1.Martek Biosciences CorporationColumbiaUSA

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