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Spectral mechanisms in the tree squirrel retina

Summary

The retina of the gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) contains rods and cones in a ratio of about 2∶3. The spectral mechanisms in this retina were examined in behavioral and electrophysiological experiments. Tests of color vision revealed that this animal has a spectral neutral point at about 500 nm and, thus, dichromatic color vision. Recordings made from single optic nerve fibers and results obtained from an analysis of the flicker photometric electroretinogram (ERG) indicated that vision in the gray squirrel is based on three spectral mechanisms. One of these, presumably rod-based, has peak sensitivity at about 502 nm. The other two mechanisms reflect the presence of two classes of cone having average peak sensitivity of about 444 nm and 543 nm.

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Correspondence to Gerald H. Jacobs.

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Blakeslee, B., Jacobs, G.H. & Neitz, J. Spectral mechanisms in the tree squirrel retina. J. Comp. Physiol. 162, 773–780 (1988). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00610966

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Keywords

  • Color
  • Retina
  • Optic Nerve
  • Nerve Fiber
  • Color Vision