Article

Journal of Experimental Criminology

, Volume 5, Issue 3, pp 273-297

Open Access This content is freely available online to anyone, anywhere at any time.

Adherence to Scheduled Sessions in a Randomized Field Trial of Case Management: The Criminal Justice–Drug Abuse Treatment Studies Transitional Case Management Study

  • Michael PrendergastAffiliated withIntegrated Substance Abuse Programs, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California Los Angeles Email author 
  • , Lisa GreenwellAffiliated withIntegrated Substance Abuse Programs, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California Los Angeles
  • , Jerome CartierAffiliated withIntegrated Substance Abuse Programs, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California Los Angeles
  • , JoAnn SacksAffiliated withCenter for the Integration of Research & Practice, National Development & Research Institutes, Inc.
  • , Linda FrismanAffiliated withResearch Division, Connecticut Department of Mental Health & Addiction Services
  • , Eleni RodisAffiliated withResearch Division, Connecticut Department of Mental Health & Addiction Services
  • , Jennifer R. HavensAffiliated withCenter on Drug and Alcohol Research, University of Kentucky

Abstract

The Transitional Case Management (TCM) study, one of the projects of the Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies (CJ-DATS) cooperative, was a multi-site randomized test of whether a strengths-based case management intervention provided during an inmate’s transition from incarceration to the community increases participation in community substance abuse treatment, enhances access to needed social services, and improves drug use and crime outcomes. As in many intervention studies, TCM experienced a relatively large percentage of treatment-group participants who attended few or no scheduled sessions. The paper discusses issues with regard to participation in community case management sessions, examines patterns of session attendance among TCM participants, and analyzes client and case manager characteristics that are associated with number of sessions attended and with patterns of attendance. The average number of sessions (out of 12) attended was 5.7. Few client or case manager characteristics were found to be significantly related to session attendance. Clinical and research implications of the findings and of adherence in case management generally are discussed.

Keywords

Case management Experimental design Field experiments Implementation Offender treatment Session attendance