Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 44, Issue 1, pp 120–136

The changing prevalence of autism in three regions of Canada

  • Hélène Ouellette-Kuntz
  • Helen Coo
  • Miu Lam
  • Marlene M. Breitenbach
  • Paula E. Hennessey
  • Paulette D. Jackman
  • M. E. Suzanne Lewis
  • Deborah Dewey
  • François P. Bernier
  • Amy M. Chung
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-013-1856-1

Cite this article as:
Ouellette-Kuntz, H., Coo, H., Lam, M. et al. J Autism Dev Disord (2014) 44: 120. doi:10.1007/s10803-013-1856-1

Abstract

In 2002/2003, the National Epidemiologic Database for the Study of Autism in Canada started capturing information on children diagnosed with autism in different regions of the country. Based on data collected through 2008 in Newfoundland and Labrador and 2010 in Prince Edward Island and Southeastern Ontario, the estimated average annual percent increases in prevalence among children 2–14 years of age ranged from 9.7 % (95 % CI 7.8–11.6) to 14.6 % (95 % CI 11.3–18.0). Differential in-migration and identification of previously undetected cases may have contributed in part to the increases observed, but we cannot rule out the possibility of a true increase in incidence, particularly given the lack of a leveling-off of prevalence among the 6- to 9-year olds.

Keywords

Autism Surveillance Canada NEDSAC 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hélène Ouellette-Kuntz
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • Helen Coo
    • 1
    • 3
  • Miu Lam
    • 1
  • Marlene M. Breitenbach
    • 5
  • Paula E. Hennessey
    • 6
    • 7
  • Paulette D. Jackman
    • 7
  • M. E. Suzanne Lewis
    • 3
    • 8
  • Deborah Dewey
    • 3
    • 9
    • 10
  • François P. Bernier
    • 3
    • 11
  • Amy M. Chung
    • 2
    • 12
  1. 1.Department of Public Health SciencesQueen’s UniversityKingstonCanada
  2. 2.Department of Community Health and EpidemiologyQueen’s UniversityKingstonCanada
  3. 3.Autism Spectrum Disorders-Canadian American Research Consortium (ASD-CARC)KingstonCanada
  4. 4.Ongwanada Resource CentreKingstonCanada
  5. 5.Department of Education and Early Childhood DevelopmentSummersideCanada
  6. 6.Department of Health and Community ServicesSt. John’sCanada
  7. 7.Department of EducationSt. John’sCanada
  8. 8.Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia and Children’s & Women’s Health Centre of B.C.VancouverCanada
  9. 9.Departments of Pediatrics and Community Health SciencesUniversity of CalgaryCalgaryCanada
  10. 10.Behavioural Research UnitAlberta Children’s HospitalCalgaryCanada
  11. 11.Department of Medical GeneticsUniversity of CalgaryCalgaryCanada
  12. 12.Department of Molecular GeneticsUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada