EcoHealth

, 4:125

Spread of Chytridiomycosis Has Caused the Rapid Global Decline and Extinction of Frogs

Authors

    • Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Veterinary and Biomedical SciencesJames Cook University
  • Lee Berger
    • Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation SciencesJames Cook University
  • Richard Speare
    • Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation SciencesJames Cook University
  • Scott Cashins
    • Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Tropical BiologyJames Cook University
  • Keith Raymond McDonald
    • Amphibian Disease Ecology GroupQueensland Parks and Wildlife Service
  • Andrea Dawn Phillott
    • Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Veterinary and Biomedical SciencesJames Cook University
  • Harry Bryan Hines
    • Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service
  • Nicole Kenyon
    • Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Tropical BiologyJames Cook University
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10393-007-0093-5

Cite this article as:
Skerratt, L.F., Berger, L., Speare, R. et al. EcoHealth (2007) 4: 125. doi:10.1007/s10393-007-0093-5

Abstract

The global emergence and spread of the pathogenic, virulent, and highly transmissible fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, resulting in the disease chytridiomycosis, has caused the decline or extinction of up to about 200 species of frogs. Key postulates for this theory have been completely or partially fulfilled. In the absence of supportive evidence for alternative theories despite decades of research, it is important for the scientific community and conservation agencies to recognize and manage the threat of chytridiomycosis to remaining species of frogs, especially those that are naive to the pathogen. The impact of chytridiomycosis on frogs is the most spectacular loss of vertebrate biodiversity due to disease in recorded history.

Keywords

chytridiomycosisBatrachochytrium dendrobatidisdeclineextinctionfrogsamphibianspostulatesglobal

Copyright information

© Ecohealth Journal Consortium 2007