Encyclopedia of Security and Emergency Management

Living Edition
| Editors: Lauren R. Shapiro, Marie-Helen Maras

Criminals: Terrorist

  • James M. Duggan
  • James J. F. ForestEmail author
Living reference work entry

Latest version View entry history

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-69891-5_261-3

Definition

Terrorists are criminals who commit or directly support acts of violence in order to achieve some type of sociopolitical objectives.

Introduction

This chapter examines the groups and individuals who commit or directly support acts of terrorism. The phenomenon of terrorism itself will be covered in other chapters of this volume, including “Terrorism: Domestic” and “Terrorism: International”.” Terrorists are widely considered a distinct type of criminals. They consciously choose to kill, maim and destroy, and also routinely engage in money laundering, theft, fraud, extortion, smuggling (including drugs, weapons, and humans), kidnapping, bank robbery, and many other kinds of criminal activity. But terrorists generally loathe being labeled as ordinary criminals, preferring to use labels like “freedom fighters” or in the case of some religious groups, “holy warriors.” And as described later in this chapter, terrorism is also viewed as a type of political violence.

Generally...

Keywords

Terrorist - Extremist perpetrator Radicalized criminal 
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References

  1. Corner, E., & Gill, P. (2015). A false dichotomy? Mental illness and lone actor terrorism. Law and Human Behavior, 39(1), 23–34.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Crenshaw, M., & Lafree, G. (2017). Countering terrorism. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press.Google Scholar
  3. Forest, J. (2018). The terrorism lectures (3rd ed.). Santa Ana: Nortia Press.Google Scholar
  4. Gurr, T. (2016). Why men rebel: 40th anniversary edition. New York: Routledge. [originally published in 1970].Google Scholar
  5. Hoffman, B. (2017). Inside terrorism (3rd ed.). New York: Columbia University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Horgan, J. (2005). The social and psychological characteristics of terrorism and terrorists. In T. Bjorgo (Ed.), Root causes of terrorism: Myths, realities and ways forward. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  7. Horgan, J. (2009). Walking away from terrorism: Accounts of disengagement from radical and extremist movements. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  8. McCauley, C. (2007). Psychological issues in understanding terrorism and response to terrorism. In C. Stout (Ed.), Psychology of terrorism: Coping with the continuing threat. Westport: Praeger.Google Scholar
  9. Silke, A. (2004). An introduction to terrorism research. In A. Silke (Ed.), Research on terrorism: Trends, achievements and failures. London: Frank Cass.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Further Reading

  1. Abrahms, M. (2008). What terrorists really want: Terrorist motives and counterterrorism strategy. International Security, 32(4), 78–105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Forest, J. (2018). The terrorism lectures (3rd ed.). Santa Ana: Nortia Press.Google Scholar
  3. Hoffman, B. (2017). Inside terrorism (3rd ed.). New York: Columbia University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Terrorism and Security StudiesUniversity of Massachusetts LowellLowellUSA