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Affinity Tags in Protein Purification and Peptide Enrichment: An Overview

Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB,volume 2178)

Abstract

The reversible interaction between an affinity ligand and a complementary receptor has been widely explored in purification systems for several biomolecules. The development of tailored affinity ligands highly specific toward particular target biomolecules is one of the options in affinity purification systems. However, both genetic and chemical modifications in proteins and peptides widen the application of affinity ligand-tag receptors pairs toward universal capture and purification strategies. In particular, this chapter will focus on two case studies highly relevant for biotechnology and biomedical areas, namely the affinity tags and receptors employed on the production of recombinant fusion proteins, and the chemical modification of phosphate groups on proteins and peptides and the subsequent specific capture and enrichment, a mandatory step before further proteomic analysis.

Key words

  • Recombinant proteins
  • Fusion proteins
  • Affinity tags
  • Affinity purification
  • Phosphoproteomics

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Acknowledgments

This work was financed by FCT/MEC (UID/Multi/04378/2019) and co-financed by the ERDF under the PT2020 Partnership Agreement (POCI-01-0145-FEDER-007728). The authors thank FCT/MEC for the research fellowship SFRH/BPD/97585/2013 for A.S.P, SFRH/BD/64427/2009 for I.L.B. and A.M.G.C.D. for Junior Research contract under Sea2See project financed by FCT (PTDC/BII-BIO/28878/2017) and co-financed by ERDF under the PT2020 Partnership Agreement (LISBOA-01-0145-FEDER-028878).

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Pina, A.S., Batalha, Í.L., Dias, A.M.G.C., Roque, A.C.A. (2021). Affinity Tags in Protein Purification and Peptide Enrichment: An Overview. In: Labrou, N.E. (eds) Protein Downstream Processing. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol 2178. Humana, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-0716-0775-6_10

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