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Staying In: The Moses-God Exchanges on the Passover

  • Bernon Lee
Chapter
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Part of the Postcolonialism and Religions book series (PCR)

Abstract

In this chapter, Lee brings the tendentious nature of reading/speaking to the fore in scrutinizing the God-Moses speeches in Exodus 11:1–13:16. Through the speeches, Lee traces the binary logic—Israelite/foreigner, inside(r)/outside(r), security/hazard, holy/profane—in defining exclusive, and excluded, categories from the Passover rites to the institution of firstfruits/firstling offerings. Lee demonstrates that, from the outset, Israel’s articulation of its boundaries is a contention of perspectives set in the very tissue of the text. Moses and God, in tandem, cast and expand the web of categories that define ‘Israel.’ Speaking/reading, therefore, is essentially interactive.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bernon Lee
    • 1
  1. 1.Bethel UniversitySt. PaulUSA

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