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Drug Interactions

Abstract

A drug interaction is a situation in which a drug, food or other extrinsic and intrinsic factors affect the activity of a medication, i.e. the effects of the medication are increased or decreased, or the combination of substances produces a new effect that neither of them produces on its own. Thereby often the efficacy or toxicity of a medication is changed.

Keywords

  • Absorption
  • ADME
  • Adverse drug reaction
  • Antibiotics
  • Cytochrome P 450 (CYP) family
  • Distribution
  • Elimination
  • Metabolism
  • Pharmacodynamics
  • Pharmacokinetics
  • Polypharmacy
  • P-glycoprotein (P-gp)
  • Statins

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Zeitlinger, M. (2016). Drug Interactions. In: Müller, M. (eds) Clinical Pharmacology: Current Topics and Case Studies. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-27347-1_17

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