Moderating and Mediating Processes in Environment-Behavior Research

  • Gary W. Evans
  • Stephen J. Lepore
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Environment, Behavior and Design book series (AEBD, volume 4)

Abstract

Many environment—behavior (EB) researchers are interested in the effects of the physical environment on human behavior. However, many researchers appreciate the theoretical and methodological importance of scrutinizing other variables that can intercede in the EB relation (Evans & Cohen, 1987; Moore, 1988; Wachs, 1986; Wohlwill, 1983). Typically, one speaks of other variables that can moderate or mediate EB relations. Moderator variables are “third” variables that alter or qualify EB relations. In contrast, mediator variables interpret, or explain, EB relations.

Keywords

Permeability Depression Attenuation Covariance Posit 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary W. Evans
    • 1
  • Stephen J. Lepore
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Design and Environmental AnalysisCornell UniversityIthacaUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyCarnegie-Mellon UniversityPittsburghUSA

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