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Scrapie

Unconventional Infectious Agent
  • Richard I. Carp
Part of the Infectious Agents and Pathogenesis book series (IAPA)

Abstract

In 1954, Bjorn Sigurdsson, an Icelandic virologist, summed up a series of experiments that he had been conducting on a number of diseases of sheep, including visna and scrapie.l In comparing his results with those obtained in the burgeoning field of virology, Sigurdsson proposed a new category of infectious diseases, slow infections. He proposed three criteria for slow infections: (1) a very long incubation period lasting from several months to many years; (2) a regular, progressive, and protracted course after the appearance of clinical signs that almost invariably ends in death; and (3) limitation of infection to a single host species and histopathological changes to a single organ or tissue system. Sigurdsson correctly predicted that the third criterion would not stand the test of time, and results on this are detailed later.

Keywords

Short Incubation Period Scrapie Agent Scrapie Strain Scrapie Prion Scrapie Infection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard I. Carp
    • 1
  1. 1.New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental DisabilitiesStaten IslandUSA

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