Advertisement

Immunogenicity of Recombinant Feline Infectious Peritonitis Virus Spike Protein in Mice and Kittens

  • Harry Vennema
  • Raoul J. de Groot
  • David A. Harbour
  • Mieke Dalderup
  • Tim Gruffydd-Jones
  • Marian C. Horzinek
  • Willy J. M. Spaan
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 276)

Summary

The gene encoding the fusogenic spike protein of the Coronavirus causing feline infectious peritonitis (FIPV) was recombined into the genome of vaccinia virus, strain WR. The recombinant induced spike protein specific, in vitro neutralizing antibodies in mice. When kittens were immunized with the recombinant, low titers of neutralizing antibodies were obtained. After challenge with FIPV, these animals succumbed earlier than the vWR-immunized control group (“early death syndrome”).

Keywords

Vaccinia Virus Infectious Bronchitis Virus Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Recombinant Vaccinia Virus Spike Protein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Literature

  1. 1.
    Pedersen, N.C., and J.W. Black. 1983. Attempted immunization of cats against feline infectious peritonitis, using avirulent live virus or sublethal amounts of virulent virus. Am. J. Vet. Res. 44:229–234.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Pedersen, N.C., and J.F. Boyle. 1980. Immunologic phenomena in the effusive form of feline infectious peritonitis. Am. J. Vet. Res. 41:868–876.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Pedersen, N.C., J.F. Boyle, K. Floyd, A. Fudge, and J. Barker. 1981. An enteric Coronavirus infection of cats and its relationship to feline infectious peritonitis. Am. J. Vet. Res. 42:368–377.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Pedersen, N.C., J.F. Evermann, J. Alison, A.J. McKeirnan, and R.L. Ott. 1984. Pathogenicity studies of feline Coronavirus isolates 79–1146 and 79–1683. Am. J. Vet. Res. 45:2580–2585.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Pedersen, N.C., and K. Floyd. 1985. Experimental studies with three new strains of feline infectious peritonitis virus: FIPV-UCD2, FIPV-UCD3, FIPV-UCD4. Compend. Contin. Educ. Pract. Vet. 7:1001–1011.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Porterfield, J.S. 1986. Antibody-dependent enhancement of viral infectivity. Adv. Virus Res. 31:335–355.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Spaan, W., D. Cavanagh, and M.C. Horzinek. 1988. Coronaviruses: Structure and genome expression. J. Gen. Virol. 69:2939–2952.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Stoddart, C.A., and F.W. Scott. 1989. Intrinsic resistance of feline peritoneal macrophages to Coronavirus infection correlates well with in vivo virulence. J. Virol. 63:436–440.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Weiss, R.C., and F.W. Scott. 1981. Pathogenesis of feline infectious peritonitis: pathologic changes and immunofluorescence. Am. J. Vet. Res. 42:2036–2048.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Weiss, R.C., and F.W. Scott. 1981. Pathogenesis of feline infectious peritonitis: nature and development of viremia. Am. J. Vet. Res. 42:382–390.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Weiss, R.C., and F.W. Scott. 1981. Antibody-mediated enhancement of disease in feline infectious peritonitis: comparisons with Dengue hemorrhagic fever. Comp. Immun. Microbiol. Infect. Dis. 4:175–189.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harry Vennema
    • 1
  • Raoul J. de Groot
    • 1
  • David A. Harbour
    • 2
  • Mieke Dalderup
    • 1
  • Tim Gruffydd-Jones
    • 2
  • Marian C. Horzinek
    • 1
  • Willy J. M. Spaan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Virology, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineState University of UtrechtUtrechtThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of Veterinary Medicine, Langford HouseUniversity of BristolLangford, BristolEngland

Personalised recommendations