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Research Needs for Biologically Based Risk Assessment

  • Curtis C. Travis

Abstract

Because of gaps in our current scientific understanding of the cancer-causing process, human risk assessment for chemicals which have demonstrated carcinogenicity in rodents requires the use of a series of judgmental decisions on numerous unresolved scientific issues. Major assumptions are based on the necessity to extrapolate experimental results (1) across species from mice or rats to humans, (2) from the high-dose regions to which animals are exposed in the laboratory to the low-dose regions to which humans are exposed in the environment, and (3) across routes of administration.

Keywords

Mitotic Rate Applied Dose Pharmacodynamic Model Pharmacodynamic Parameter Cancer Risk Assessment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Curtis C. Travis
    • 1
  1. 1.Office of Risk AnalysisOak Ridge National LaboratoryOak RidgeUSA

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