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Dose-Response for Radiation-Induced Cancer in Rat Skin

  • F. J. Burns
  • R. E. Albert
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 124)

Abstract

Skin has been extensively utilized to study the carcinogenic effects of environmental and industrial agents (1), Compared to internal organs, skin is relatively easy to manipulate, and tumors are detectible at earlier times. The skin contains a comparatively large variety of cell types many of which are susceptible to the action of carcinogens. For example, rat skin exposed to radiation develops a variety of tumor types including, squamous carcinomas, basal cell carcinomas, sarcomas, and sebaceous cell tumors, each of which presumably arises from different cell populations in the skin. Rat skin is sensitive to a number of environmentally-important carcinogens, including radiation, where perhaps the most extensive comparison of animal results with human epidemiological data are available (2, 3). Rat and mouse skin have proved to be sensitive and reproducible systems for studying the dose-response and time-response characteristics of radiation carcinogenesis and for investigating the mechanism relating to how the absorption of the radiation by the cells leads to cancer (4). The following chapter will describe and summarize these studies many of which have been carried out at the Institute of Environmental Medicine at New York University.

Keywords

Hair Follicle Linear Energy Transfer Single Strand Break Skin Tumor Relative Biological Effectiveness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. J. Burns
    • 1
  • R. E. Albert
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Environmental MedicineNew York University Medical CenterNew YorkUSA

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