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Relevance of Primary and Secondary Brain Damage for Outcome of Head Injury

  • J. Douglas Miller
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 115)

Abstract

The outcome of head injury in the human depends upon the interaction of pre-injury factors, the nature of the injury to the skull and brain and secondary factors that lead to further brain dysfunction and damage (Miller and Becker, 1982). The important pre-injury factors are age, the psychosocial status of the patient and state of health prior to injury, in particular previous brain injury, hydrocephalus or stroke.

Keywords

Head Injury Intracranial Hypertension Cerebral Perfusion Pressure Brain Damage Severe Head Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Douglas Miller
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Surgical NeurologyUniversity of EdinburghEdinburghScotland

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