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Prevention of Crime and Delinquency

  • Michael T. Nietzel
  • Melissa J. Himelein

Abstract

Prevention of crime is an ancient objective. In the first century A.D., Seneca exhorted his fellow Greeks, “He who does not prevent a crime when he can, encourages it,” and Cicero added, “Every evil in the bud is easily crushed.” Since Seneca and Cicero, the cloak of prevention has been wrapped around a large body of interventions, lending to these interventions an air of au courant fashionableness and providing them insulation against the stormy blasts of critics who decry their ineffectiveness, expense, or unfairness.

Keywords

Child Abuse Primary Prevention Antisocial Behavior Family Violence Crime Prevention 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael T. Nietzel
    • 1
  • Melissa J. Himelein
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of KentuckyLexingtonUSA

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