Advertisement

Simulation and Games in Environmental Education: A Workshop

  • Michael Molenda
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 18)

Abstract

Simulation — the representation of complex processes in simplified form — and gaming — activities involving competition/ cooperation and chance — appear to be promising tools for instruction, particularly for environmental education. Instruc­tional simulation/gaming puts the learner into an active participating mode in which he must make decisions concerning a dynamic, all-at-once problem. This format is also rich in feed­back, allowing constant modification of performance.

Examples of available simulation/games for environmental education are discussed. A procedure for inventing one’s own simulation/games is presented with a digest of the proceedings of the workshop, illustrating how the participants developed a prototype simulation/game right at the workshop.

Keywords

Environmental Education Public Hearing Card Game Simulation Game Instructional Objective 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Literature Cited

  1. McInnis, N. and D. Albrecht. (eds.) 1975. What makes education environmental? Data Courier, Louisville, Kentucky, U.S.A.Google Scholar

Simulations/Games Cited

  1. Community. 1972. Family Pastimes, Box 309, Boissevain, Manitoba, Canada, ROK OEO.Google Scholar
  2. Eco-Cycles. 1971. Part of a multi-media kit, No Time to Waste. Continental Can Company, Office of Environmental Affairs, 633 Third Avenue, New York, New York 10017, U.S.A.Google Scholar
  3. Ecopolis. Interact, Box 262, Lakeside, California 92040, U.S.A.Google Scholar
  4. Mountaineering. 1973. Family Pastimes, Box 309, Boissevain, Manitoba, Canada, ROK OEO.Google Scholar
  5. Planet Management Game. 1971. Houghton-Mifflin, Boston, Massachusetts 02107, U.S.A.Google Scholar
  6. Political Pollution. 1972. Edu-Game, Box 1144, Sun Valley, California 91352, U.S.A.Google Scholar
  7. Pollution Solutions. 1971. Part of a multi-media kit, Recycling Resources, Continental Can Company, Office of Environmental Affairs, 633 Third Avenue, New York, New York 10017, U.S.A.Google Scholar
  8. Terra II: Spaceship Earth. 1972. Part of Intercom Booklet No. 71, Teaching about Spaceship Earth. Intercom, 218 E. 18th Street, New York, New York 10003, U.S.A.Google Scholar

Simulation/Game Design Sources

  1. Adair, C. H., and J. T. Foster. 1972. A guide for simulation design: theoretical and practical procedures for the development of instructional simulation. Instructional Simulation Design, Inc., Box 330 Leon Station, Tallahassee, FL 32303, U.S.A.Google Scholar
  2. Horne, R. E. 1977. How students can make their own simulations. In R. E. Horn (ed.) The guide to simulations/games for education and training. Third ed. Didactic Systems, Inc., Cranford, NJ, U.S.A.Google Scholar
  3. McLean, H. W. and M. J. Raymond. 1976. Design your own game. Second ed. Simulation and Gaming Association, 4833 Greentree Road, Lebanon, Ohio, U.S.A.Google Scholar
  4. Maidment, R., and R. H. Bronstein. 1973. Simulation games: design and implementation. Charles E. Merrill, Columbus, Ohio, U.S.A.Google Scholar

Simulation/Game Directories

  1. Horn, R. E. (ed.) 1977. The guide to simulations/games for education and training. Third ed. Didactic Systems, Inc., Cranford, NJ, U.S.A.Google Scholar
  2. Stadsklev, R. (ed.) 1974. Handbook of simulation gaming in social education (Part 1: Textbook, Part 2: Directory). University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, U.S.A.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Molenda
    • 1
  1. 1.Indiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA

Personalised recommendations