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The Many Faces of Addicted Women: Implications for Treatment and Future Research

  • Beth G. Reed
  • Judith Kovach
  • Nancy Bellows
  • Rebecca Moise

Abstract

Until fairly recently, research investigating the characteristics of addicted women has been quite sparse. Women were often not included in research samples or represented in such a small percentage of the total sample that any description of their distinctive characteristics and related needs was difficult. Data were rarely analyzed and reported by sex. During the 70’s, coinciding with a general societal reappraisal of theories and knowledge about women and their service needs, substance abuse researchers began to address these omissions. This new research has identified key differences between addicted men and women (e.g., Aron and Daily, 1976) and some important value similarities between addicted and “straight” women (e.g., Miller et al., 1973).

Keywords

White Woman Black Woman 11th Grade Racial Difference Racial Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Beth G. Reed
    • 1
  • Judith Kovach
    • 1
  • Nancy Bellows
    • 1
  • Rebecca Moise
    • 1
  1. 1.Women’s Drug Research Coordinating ProjectUSA

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