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Immunity to Leukemia, Lymphoma, and Fibrosarcoma in Cats: A Case for Immunosurveillance

  • M. Essex
Part of the Contemporary Topics in Immunobiology book series (CTI, volume 6)

Abstract

Central to the discipline of tumor immunology is the hypothesis of immunosurveillance. Does the immune response act to eliminate developing clones of cancer cells in the same manner that it eliminates injurious microorganisms or grafted tissues from unrelated individuals? A great amount of work has been done in response to this question using either virus-induced tumors or transplantable tumors in inbred mice, but very few studies have been done with spontaneous tumors of outbred animals. Evidence that immunosuppressed people have a greater risk of developing certain types of tumors (Gatti and Good, 1971; Penn, 1974, 1975; Wilson and Penn, 1975) is compatible with, but not conclusive proof of, the immunosurveillance hypothesis. Further proof requires not only the demonstration of a depressed immune response to specific tumor cell membrane antigens in outbred individuals prior to tumor development but also the reciprocal—evidence of an enhanced immune response in individuals who remain free of tumors following exposure to the same oncogenic agents. Our general lack of information concerning either the etiological agents of spontaneous tumors or the existence of tumor cell membrane antigens on such tumors probably represents the major roadblock against the design of such experiments for application to outbred individuals with spontaneous tumors.

Keywords

Feline Leukemia Virus Persistent Viremia Murine Sarcoma Virus Cell Membrane Antigen Nonregenerative Anemia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Essex
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MicrobiologyHarvard University School of Public HealthBostonUSA

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