Games-Based Learning and Web 2.0 Technologies in Education: Motivating the “iLearner” Generation

  • Mark Stansfield
  • Thomas Connolly
  • Thomas Hainey
  • Gavin Baxter
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter explores the contribution that computer games and Web 2.0 technologies can provide in relation enhancing learner motivation and engagement. Such technologies are considered to be particularly suited to motivating the younger generation of learners or the “iLearner Generation”. The chapter will highlight some of the main advantages and problems associated with computer games in education, as well as highlighting a recent project, the Web 2.0 European Resource Centre, which is aimed at enabling the mass of educators who find ICT confusing and frightening to have a simple and secure environment to use Web 2.0 technologies within their class.

Keywords

Europe Turkey Malone Ethos 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The ARG project reported in this chapter was supported by the EU Comenius Programme under contract 133909-2007-UK-COMENIUS-CMP. The Web 2.0 ERC project reported in this chapter was supported by the EU KA3 ICT Multilateral Projects Programme under contract 504839-LLP-1-209-1-UK-KA3-KA3MP.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark Stansfield
    • 1
  • Thomas Connolly
    • 1
  • Thomas Hainey
    • 1
  • Gavin Baxter
    • 1
  1. 1.School of ComputingUniversity of the West of ScotlandPaisleyUK

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