Advertisement

A New Practice Course for Freshmen Using RoboCup Based Small Robots

  • Yasunori Nagasaka
  • Morihiko Saeki
  • Shoichi Shibata
  • Hironobu Fujiyoshi
  • Takashi Fujii
  • Toshiyuki Sakata
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4020)

Abstract

Contemporary engineers need to have the ability not only to freely make use of their professional knowledge and skills, but also to integrate and combine a wide range of knowledge and skills and to build a complex system to solve a problem. But the current educational programs of individual departments (mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, electronic engineering, computer science) are usually designed and performed independently. Therefore it is hard for students to understand how knowledge and technologies of each field are integrated and combined in the objects of the real world. In order to increase student understanding in this area, we propose a new practice course dealing with a completely functional object: a robot.

Keywords

Robot Soccer Main Board Springer Verlag Lecture Note Small Size League Intensive Class 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Martin, F.: Kids Learning Engineering Science Using LEGO and the Programmable Brick. In: Proc. AERA 1996 (1996)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Mataric, M.J.: Robotics Education for All Ages. In: Proc. AAAI Spring Symposium on Accessible, Hands-on AI and Robotics Education (2004)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    D’Andrea, R.: Robot Soccer: A Platform for Systems Engineering. Computers in Education Journal 10(1), 57–61 (2000)CrossRefMathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Baltes, J., Sklar, E., Anderson, J.: Teaching with robocup, Accessible Hands-on Artificial Intelligence and Robotics Education, SS-04-01. In: AAAI Spring Symposium, pp.146–152 (2004)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Anderson, J., Baltes, J., Livingston, D., Sklar, E., Tower, J.: Toward an undergraduate league for roboCup. In: Polani, D., Browning, B., Bonarini, A., Yoshida, K. (eds.) RoboCup 2003. LNCS, vol. 3020, pp. 670–677. Springer, Heidelberg (2004)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Sklar, E., Parsons, S., Stone, P.: RoboCup in Higher Education: A Preliminary Report. In: Polani, D., Browning, B., Bonarini, A., Yoshida, K. (eds.) RoboCup 2003. LNCS, vol. 3020, pp. 296–307. Springer, Heidelberg (2004)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
  8. 8.
    Stone, P.: RoboCup as an Introduction to CS Research. In: Polani, D., Browning, B., Bonarini, A., Yoshida, K. (eds.) RoboCup 2003. LNCS, vol. 3020, pp. 284–295. Springer, Heidelberg (2004)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Coradeschi, S., Malec, J.: How to make a challenging AI course enjoyable using the RoboCup soccer simulation system. In: Asada, M., Kitano, H. (eds.) RoboCup 1998. LNCS (LNAI), vol. 1604, pp. 120–124. Springer, Heidelberg (1999)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
  11. 11.
    Fujii, T., Fujiyoshi, H., Nagasaka, Y., Takahashi, T.: RoboCup Small Robots as Education Platform for Undergraduate Students. In: SICE System Integration Division Annual Conference, pp. 205–206 (December 2002) (in Japanese)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yasunori Nagasaka
    • 1
  • Morihiko Saeki
    • 2
  • Shoichi Shibata
    • 3
  • Hironobu Fujiyoshi
    • 3
  • Takashi Fujii
    • 3
  • Toshiyuki Sakata
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. of Electronics and Information Engineering 
  2. 2.Dept. of Mechanical Engineering 
  3. 3.Dept. of Computer ScienceChubu University College of EngineeringJapan

Personalised recommendations