A Self-regulated Learning Perspective on Student Engagement

Abstract

Models of both self-regulated learning and student engagement have been used to help understand why some students are successful in school while others are not. The goal of this chapter is to provide greater insight into the relations between these two theoretical frameworks. The first section presents a basic model of self-regulated learning, outlining the primary phases and areas involved in that process. The next section discusses key similarities and differences between aspects of self-regulated learning and features of student engagement, drawing on both theoretical suggestions and empirical research. The final section offers ideas and avenues for additional research that would serve to better link self-regulated learning and student engagement.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of HoustonHoustonUSA

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