Convection in Liquids

  • Jean Karl Platten
  • Jean Claude Legros

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XIV
  2. Introduction

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Jean Karl Platten, Jean Claude Legros
      Pages 2-76
    3. Jean Karl Platten, Jean Claude Legros
      Pages 77-146
  3. Fluids at Constant Density, Isothermal Forced Convection

    1. Front Matter
      Pages N1-N1
    2. Jean Karl Platten, Jean Claude Legros
      Pages 147-253
    3. Jean Karl Platten, Jean Claude Legros
      Pages 254-290
    4. Jean Karl Platten, Jean Claude Legros
      Pages 291-314
  4. Non Isothermal One Component Systems

    1. Front Matter
      Pages N3-N3
    2. Jean Karl Platten, Jean Claude Legros
      Pages 315-499
    3. Jean Karl Platten, Jean Claude Legros
      Pages 500-528
    4. Jean Karl Platten, Jean Claude Legros
      Pages 529-566
  5. Multicomponent Systems

    1. Front Matter
      Pages N5-N5
    2. Jean Karl Platten, Jean Claude Legros
      Pages 567-656
    3. Jean Karl Platten, Jean Claude Legros
      Pages 657-675
  6. Back Matter
    Pages 676-679

About this book

Introduction

Both of the authors of this book are disciples and collaborators of the Brussels school of thermodynamics. Their particular domain of competence is the application of numerical methods to the many highly nonlinear problems which have arisen in the context of recent developments in the thermodynamics of irreversi­ ble processes: stability of states far from equilibrium, search for marginal critical states, bifwrcation phenomena, multiple stationnary states, dissipative structures, etc. These problems cannot in general be handled using only the clas­ sical and mathematically rigorous methods of the theory of differential, partial differential, and int~grodifferential equations. The present authors demonstrate how approximate methods, re lyi ng usually on powerful computers, lead to significant progress in these areas, if one is prepa­ red to accept a certain lack of rigor, such as, for example, the lack of proof for the convergence of the series used in the context of problems which are not self adjoint, nor even linear. The results thus obtained must consequently be submit­ ted to an exacting confrontation with experimental observations. - Even though, the '1 imited information obtained concerning the, often unsuspec­ ted, mechanisms underlying the observed phenomena is both precious and frequently sufficient. This information results from the properties of the trial functions best suited to the constraints of the problem such as the initial, boundary, and "feedback" conditions, and the analysis of their behavior in the course of the evolution of the system.

Keywords

Pet Profil behavior convection development dynamics evolution fluid dynamics information laminar flow lead numerical method system thermodynamics turbulence

Authors and affiliations

  • Jean Karl Platten
    • 1
  • Jean Claude Legros
    • 2
  1. 1.Service de Chimie Physique ThermodynamiqueUniversité de l’Etat à Mons, Faculté des SciencesMonsBelgique
  2. 2.Ecole Polytechnique, Faculté des Sciences AppliquéesUniversité Libre de BruxellesBruxellesBelgique

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-82095-3
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1984
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-82097-7
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-82095-3
  • About this book