Imaging of the Brain in Psychiatry and Related Fields

  • Konrad Maurer

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XIX
  2. Structural Imaging Methods (Computerized Tomography/Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. S. Heckers, H. Heinsen, H. Beckmann
      Pages 27-30
    3. B. Bogerts, P. Falkai, M. Haupts, B. Greve, U. Tapernon-Franz, U. Heinzmann
      Pages 31-35
    4. C. Colombo, G. Calabrese, S. Livian, G. Scotti, S. Scarone
      Pages 37-41
    5. S. Schlege, D. Nieber
      Pages 43-46
    6. G. Birbamer, S. Felber, A. Kampfl, F. Aichner, F. Gerstenbrand, H. Benesch
      Pages 47-51
    7. T. Becker, M. Lanczik, E. Hofmann, T. Müller, M. Warmuth-Metz, J. Fritze et al.
      Pages 53-56
    8. A. L. Malizia, M. G. Graves, J. B. Bingham, J. R. Bartlett, P. K. Bridges
      Pages 57-60
  3. Functional Imaging Methods (Cerebral Blood Flow/Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography)

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 71-71
    2. S. Warkentin, J. Risberg
      Pages 73-80
    3. E. Cantor-Graae, S. Warkentin, G. Franzén, D. H. Ingvar, J. Risberg
      Pages 81-85
    4. P. Rubin, L. Friberg, S. Holm, P. Videbech, H. S. Andersen, B. B. Bendsen et al.
      Pages 87-92
    5. A. Vita, G. Invernizzi, M. Garbarini, G. M. Giobbio, M. Dieci, C. Morganti et al.
      Pages 93-96

About these proceedings

Introduction

In the last two decades imaging of the brain, or neuroimaging, has become an integral part of clinical and research psychiatry. This is due to recent advances in computer technology, which has made it relatively easy to generate brain images representing structure and function of the central nervous system. Currently used clinical diagnostic imaging modalities, such as X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) , provide predominantly anatomic information. CT images reflect X-ray attenuation distribution within the brain, whereas MRI signals depend primarily on proton sensitivity and tissue relaxivity. The chapter "Structural Imaging Methods" reviews CT and MRI studies on schizophrenic and affective disorders and degenera­ tive central nervous system diseases. The impact of fast three­ dimensional (3-0) imaging and the automatic transfer from 3-D elements in the brain to artificial diagrams based on this information is considered. Since the original report of the findings of Ingvar and Franzen in 1974 and the introduction of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measurements, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been gaining acceptance as one of the major imaging techniques, and it is available in most nuclear medicine depart­ ments. The section "Functional Imaging Methods (Cerebral Blood Flow - CBF, Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography - SPECT)" describes rCBF studies with the 133Xe inhalation method utilizing a 254 detector system and rCBF images measured by SPECT using the tracer 99mTc-HMPAO.

Keywords

PET SPECT brain computed tomography (CT) electroencephalography (EEG) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) neuroimaging neurology neuroradiology positron emission tomography (PET) psychiatry radiology

Editors and affiliations

  • Konrad Maurer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of WürzburgWürzburgGermany

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-77087-6
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-77089-0
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-77087-6
  • About this book