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Sensory Coding in the Mammalian Nervous System

  • George Somjen

Part of the Neuroscience Series book series (NSC)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxi
  2. Introduction

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. George Somjen
      Pages 3-7
    3. George Somjen
      Pages 9-15
    4. George Somjen
      Pages 17-30
  3. The First-Order Code

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 31-31
    2. George Somjen
      Pages 33-49
    3. George Somjen
      Pages 51-74
    4. George Somjen
      Pages 75-82
    5. George Somjen
      Pages 83-98
    6. George Somjen
      Pages 99-123
    7. George Somjen
      Pages 125-199
  4. Coding in the Center

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 201-201
    2. George Somjen
      Pages 203-214
    3. George Somjen
      Pages 215-236
    4. George Somjen
      Pages 237-263
    5. George Somjen
      Pages 265-274
    6. George Somjen
      Pages 275-299
    7. George Somjen
      Pages 301-304
  5. Postscript

    1. George Somjen
      Pages 305-313
  6. Literature

    1. George Somjen
      Pages 315-322
  7. Back Matter
    Pages 323-386

About this book

Introduction

Great advances have been made in the area of sensory physiology during the last few decades, and these developments seem to be asking for a comprehensive review that is manageable in size and cohesive in content. This volume has been written with that goal in mind. In the fIrst place I would like to thank Mr. R. van Frank of Appleton-Century-Crofts for asking me to do the job, and my wife for persuading me to do it, for writing it was an enjoyable task. Much of the discussion of factual data set to print here evolved in question-and-answer sessions in courses given to students in physiology, psychology, and medicine, and to physicians training in neurology, neurosur­ gery, and psychiatry. Besides my students, I had in mind while preparing this text my professional colleagues laboring on their lecture notes under circum­ stances perhaps not unlike my own. The material is divided in two parts. The first deals with the manner of representation of sensory information in peripheral nerves: the so-called first order code. The second half of the text deals with the handling of sense data by the central nervous system. One reason for dividing the material in this way is that many of the features of the first-order code are common to all sensory modalities. The intensity, the place, the rhythm, the "quality" of stimuli are encoded by rules which are applicable, albeit with appropriate modifIcations, to all senses. Furthermore, these rules of coding are today rather well understood.

Keywords

brain cortex development information medicine nervous system perception physiology psychology quality receptor system

Authors and affiliations

  • George Somjen
    • 1
  1. 1.Duke UniversityUSA

Bibliographic information