Skip to main content

Inheritance of Terminal Heat Tolerance in Two Spring Wheat Crosses

Abstract

The objective of this study was to develop an understanding about the genetics of terminal heat tolerance in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The minimum number of genes was assessed using Mendelian and quantitative genetic approach. Two crosses were made between heat tolerant and heat susceptible bread wheat cultivars: NW1014 × HUW468 and HUW234 × HUW468. Heat susceptible HUW468 was common in both the crosses. The F4, F5 and F6 generations were evaluated including F1 in two different dates of sowing (normal and very late) under field conditions in year 2006–07. The data was recorded for grain fill duration (GFD) and thousand-grain weight (TGW). Based on data of two dates, decline% and heat susceptibility index (HSI) of GFD and TGW were estimated. Heat tolerance in F1 showed absence of dominance. Estimation of genes using Mendelian approach in F4, F5 and F6 progenies (148–157) of the two crosses suggested that heat tolerance was governed by a minimum of three genes. Quantitative approach also indicated similar number of genes. The distribution of progeny lines in F4 and F6 supported the polygene nature of heat tolerance. These genes if mapped by molecular approach can play an important role through marker assisted selection (MAS) for developing improved thermo-tolerant lines of wheat.

References

  • Ashraf, M. 2010. Inducing drought tolerance in plants: recent advances. Biotechnol. Adv. 28:169–183.

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  • Barakat, M.N., Al-Doss, A.A., Elshafei, A.A., Moustafa, K.A. 2011. Identification of new microsatellite marker linked to the grain filling rate as indicator for heat tolerance genes in F2 wheat population. Aust. J. Crop Sci. 5:104–110.

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • Barnabas, B., Jäger, K., Feher, A. 2008. The effect of drought and heat stress on reproductive processes in cereals. Plant Cell Env. 31:11–38.

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • Battisti, D.S., Naylor, R.L. 2009. Historical warnings of future food insecurity with unprecedented seasonal heat. Science 323 (5911):240–244.

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  • Blum, A. 1988. Plant Breeding for Stress Environments. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, USA.

    Google Scholar 

  • Blum, A., Mayer, J., Gozlan, G. 1982. Infrared thermal sensing of plant canopies as a screening technique for dehydration avoidance in wheat. Field Crop Res. 5:137–146.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Dhanda, S.S., Munjal, R. 2006. Inheritance of cellular thermotolerance in bread wheat. Plant Breeding 125:557–564.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Fehr, W.R. 1987. Principles of Cultivar Development. Theory and Technique. Macmillan Publishing, New York, USA, Vol. 1, pp. 1–536.

    Google Scholar 

  • Fischer, R.A., Maurer, R. 1978. Drought resistance in spring wheat cultivars. I. Grain yield responses. Aust. J. Agric. Res. 29:897–907.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Ibrahim, A.M.H., Quick, J.S. 2001. Genetic control of high temperature tolerance in wheat as measured by membrane thermal stability. Crop Sci. 41:1405–1407.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Joshi, A.K., Kumar, S., Chand, R., Ortiz-Ferrara, G. 2004. Inheritance of resistance to spot blotch caused by Bipolaris sorokiniana in spring wheat. Plant Breed. 123:213–219.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Joshi, A.K., Chand, R., Arun, B., Singh, R.P., Ortiz Ferrara, G. 2007a. Breeding crops for reduced-tillage management in the intensive, rice-wheat systems of south Asia. Euphytica 153:135–151.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Joshi, A.K., Mishra, B., Chatrath, R., Ortiz Ferrara, G., Singh, R.P. 2007b. Wheat improvement in India: Present status, emerging challenges and future prospects. Euphytica 157:431–446.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Lillemo, M., van Ginkel, M., Trethowan, R.M., Hernandez, E., Crossa, J. 2005. Differential adaptation of CIMMYT bread wheat to global high temperature environments. Crop Sci. 45:2443–2453.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Mason, R.E., Mondal, S., Beecher, F.W., Pacheco, A., Jampala, B., Ibrahim, A.M.H., Hays, D.B. 2010. QTL associated with heat susceptibility index in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) under short-term reproductive stage heat stress. Euphytica 174:423–436.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Mulitez, D.K., Baker, R.J. 1995. Genotype assay and methods of moments analyses of five quantitative traits in spring wheat cross. Crop Sci. 25:162–167.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Ortiz, R., Sayre, K.D., Govaerts, B., Gupta, R., Subbarao, G.V., Ban, T., Hodson, D., Dixon, J.M., Ortiz-Monasterio, J.I., Reynolds, M. 2008. Climate change: can wheat beat the heat? Agr. Ecosyst. Environ. 126:46–58.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Paliwal, P., Röder, M.S., Kumar, U., Srivastava, J.P., Joshi, A.K. 2012. QTL mapping of terminal heat tolerance in hexaploid wheat (T. aestivum L.). Theor. Appl. Genet. 125:561–575.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Pinto, R.S., Reynolds, M.P., McIntyre, C.L., Olivares-Villegas, J.J., Chapman, S.C. 2010. Heat and drought QTL in a wheat population designed to minimize confounding agronomic effects. Theor. Appl. Genet. 121:1001–1021.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Saadalla, M.M., Shanahan, J.F., Quick, J.S. 1990. Heat tolerance in winter wheat. I. Hardening and genetic effects on membrane thermostability. Crop Sci. 30:1243–1247.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Singh, R.P., Rajaram, S. 1991. Resistant to Puccinia recondite f. sp. tritici in 50 Mexican bread wheat cultivars. Crop Sci. 31:1472–1479.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Singh, R.P., Hong, M., Rajaram, S. 1995. Genetic analysis of resistance to scab in spring wheat cultivar ‘Frontana’. Plant Disease 79:238–240.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Wardlaw, I.F., Dawson, I.A., Munibi, P., Fewster, R. 1989a. The tolerance of wheat to high temperatures during reproductive growth. I. Survey procedures and general response patterns. Aust. J. Agric. Res. 40:1–13.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Wardlaw, I.F., Dawson, I.A., Munibi, P. 1989b. The tolerance of wheat to high temperatures during reproductive growth. II. Grain development. Aust. J. Agric. Res. 40:15–24.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Wright, S. 1968. Evolution and the Genetics of Populations. Vol. 1, Genetic and Biometric Foundations. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL, USA.

    Google Scholar 

  • Yang, J., Sears, R.G., Gill, B.S., Paulsen, G.M. 2002. Quantitative and molecular characterization of heat tolerance in hexaploid wheat. Euphytica 126:275–282.

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  • Zadoks, J.C., Chang, T.T., Konzak, C.F. 1974. A decimal code the growth stages for cereals. Weed Res. 14:415–421.

    Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to A. K. Joshi.

Electronic Supplementary Material (ESM)

Rights and permissions

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Paliwal, R., Arun, B., Srivastava, J.P. et al. Inheritance of Terminal Heat Tolerance in Two Spring Wheat Crosses. CEREAL RESEARCH COMMUNICATIONS 41, 400–408 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1556/CRC.2013.0013

Download citation

  • Received:

  • Accepted:

  • Published:

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1556/CRC.2013.0013

Keywords

  • Triticum aestivum L.
  • terminal heat tolerance
  • inheritance
  • heat susceptibility index