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Journal of Cancer Education

, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp 100–104 | Cite as

Hepatitis B knowledge and practices among Cambodian immigrants

  • Vicky M. Taylor
  • Paularita Seng
  • Elizabeth Acorda
  • Lyvan Sawn
  • Lin Li
Articles

Abstract

Background. Chronic hepatitis B infection is the most common cause of liver cancer among Cambodians. Our objective was to describe Cambodian Americans’ hepatitis B knowledge, testing, and vaccination levels. Methods. A community-based telephone survey was conducted in Seattle. Our study sample included 111 individuals. Results. Less than one half (46%) of our study group had received a hepatitis B blood test, and about one third (35%) had been vaccinated against hepatitis B. Only 43% knew that Cambodians are more likely to be infected with hepatitis B than whites. Conclusions. Over 50% of our respondents did not recall being tested for hepatitis B. We identified important knowledge deficits about hepatitis B. Continued efforts should be made to implement hepatitis B educational campaigns for Cambodians.

Keywords

Chronic Hepatitis Knowledge Score Chinese Immigrant Coalition Member Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© American Association for Cancer Education 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vicky M. Taylor
    • 1
    • 2
  • Paularita Seng
    • 1
    • 3
  • Elizabeth Acorda
    • 1
  • Lyvan Sawn
    • 4
  • Lin Li
    • 1
  1. 1.the Cancer Prevention ProgramFred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (M3-B232)Seattle
  2. 2.Department of Health ServicesUniversity of WashingtonSeattle
  3. 3.Cambodian Women’s AssociationSeattle
  4. 4.Khmer Community of Seattle-King CountySeattle

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