Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society

, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp 117–135 | Cite as

Anxiety and defense in sustainability

  • Peliwe Pelisa Mnguni
Original Article

Abstract

Social defense theory is used to explore the nature of anxiety and defense in sustainability initiatives. Taking seriously the suggestion that people use social institutions for both creative and defensive purposes, I examine how the organisational processes of a consortium case study seemed to be mobilised to cope with anxiety. The insights contained herein are useful if those working in that domain are to guard against the very wastefulness they ostensibly seek to redress. The data that inform the discussion come from a qualitative research project that sought to explore the psychodynamics of partnering for sustainability.

Keywords

psychodynamics social defense sustainability impossibility anxiety 

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peliwe Pelisa Mnguni
    • 1
  1. 1.PretoriaSouth Africa

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