Tribal Participatory Research: Mechanisms of a Collaborative Model

Abstract

Although much social science research has been conducted within American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) communities, relatively little research has been conducted by or for those communities. We describe an approach that facilitates the active involvement of AIAN communities in the research process, from conceptualizing the issues to be investigated to developing a research design, and from collecting, analyzing, and interpreting the data to disseminating the results. The Tribal Participatory Research (TPR) approach is consistent with recent developments in psychology that emphasize the inclusion of community members and the social construction of knowledge. We describe the foundations of the approach and present specific mechanisms that can be employed in collaborations between researchers and AIAN communities. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of the use of TPR regarding project timelines and budgets, interpretation of the data, and ultimately the relationships between tribes and researchers.

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Fisher, P.A., Ball, T.J. Tribal Participatory Research: Mechanisms of a Collaborative Model. Am J Community Psychol 32, 207–216 (2003). https://doi.org/10.1023/B:AJCP.0000004742.39858.c5

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  • participatory research
  • collaboration
  • American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN)