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Understanding, Resisting, and Overcoming Oppression: Toward Psychopolitical Validity

Abstract

My first objective in this paper is to synthesize, synoptically, the literature on oppression and liberation with the contributions to this special issue. To fulfil this aim I introduce a framework for understanding, resisting, and overcoming oppression. The framework consists of psychopolitical well-being; experiences, consequences, and sources of oppression; and actions toward liberation. Each of these components is subdivided into 3 domains of oppression and well-being: collective, relational, and personal. Experiences of suffering as well as resistance and agency are part of the framework. My second objective is to offer ways of closing the gap between research and action on oppression and liberation. To do so I suggest 2 types of psychopolitical validity: epistemic and transformative.

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Correspondence to Isaac Prilleltensky.

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Prilleltensky, I. Understanding, Resisting, and Overcoming Oppression: Toward Psychopolitical Validity. Am J Community Psychol 31, 195–201 (2003). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1023043108210

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1023043108210

  • political validity
  • oppression
  • community interventions
  • resistance