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Transition pathways to fully automated driving and its implications for the sociotechnical system of automobility

  • Eva Fraedrich
  • Sven Beiker
  • Barbara Lenz
Review Article
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. The Future of Transport in Europe

Abstract

The advent of fully automated road vehicles is a topic currently getting attention in the field of transport as well as futures research: the technology is assumed to radically change the way we move in the future as well as to expand and differentiate existing mobility concepts. Still, the implications of automated driving are first and foremost discussed from a technological point of view and uncertainty about how this transition might take place remains. The embedding in the system of automobility respectively the transport system as a whole, currently lacks analytical as well as empirical examination. In our paper, we will discuss the topic in relation to three possible sociotechnical transition scenarios: (1) evolution, (2) revolution and (3) transformation. We will extrapolate different scenarios of automated driving based on current technical, economic, infrastructural, spatial, and transport developments and discuss its consequences for the transport system and mobility concepts.

Keywords

Autonomous driving Fully automated driving Sociotechnical transformation System of automobility 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank the Daimler and Benz foundation for funding part of the study.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Geography Department – Transport GeographyHumboldt-Universität zu BerlinBerlinGermany
  2. 2.Palo AltoUSA
  3. 3.German Aerospace CenterInstitute of Transport ResearchBerlinGermany

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