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An ICME Framework for Incorporating Bulk Residual Stresses in Rotor Component Design

  • Vasisht Venkatesh
  • Ralph Green
  • Jaime O’Connell
  • Iuliana Cernatescu
  • Robert Goetz
  • Terry Wong
  • Brian Streich
  • Vikas Saraf
  • Mike Glavicic
  • Don Slavik
  • Rajiv Sampath
  • Andrew Sharp
  • Bill Song
  • Pete Bocchini
Review Article
  • 31 Downloads

Abstract

Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) is an emerging discipline that aims to integrate computational materials science tools into a holistic system that can accelerate materials development, transform the engineering design optimization process, and unify design and manufacturing. A team of aerospace Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) and suppliers have executed a critical program to address the United States Air Force (USAF) funded Foundational Engineering Problem (FEP) on residual stress within nickel-base superalloy components. This program was aimed at establishing methods to link predictive tools to component design functions and product realization activities with industry-wide standardized protocols. The multi-disciplinary approach links supplier and OEM materials and process models with structural analysis tools to enable manufacturing parameter selection based on disk design criteria. By linking analytical tools between the supplier and OEM, process parameters may be optimized for reduced scrap, while optimizing disk designs for design requirements. A significant challenge to doing this is qualifying and integrating sources of variation in the materials and process models with design and structural analysis tools. This paper reviews ICME infrastructure tools and methods that were used to demonstrate and validate linked residual stress-based materials and manufacturing model capabilities with design activities to achieve an optimized final component. This work was funded by the United States Air Force through the Metals Affordability Initiative (MAI).

Keywords

ICME FEP Model-based materials definitions Residual stress IN718 Disk growth 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was conducted under the USAF’s Foundational Engineering Problem (FEP) on bulk residual stress development in nickel-base superalloys under the auspices of the Metals Affordability Initiative, Contract No. FA8650-13-2-5201. The support and encouragement of the FEP Program Managers (B. Song, T.J. Turner, and M.J. Caton) are gratefully acknowledged. The authors also thank Dr. Lee Semiatin at AFRL and Mr. Adrian DeWald at Hill Engineering for their excellent technical support.

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Copyright information

© The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vasisht Venkatesh
    • 1
  • Ralph Green
    • 1
  • Jaime O’Connell
    • 1
  • Iuliana Cernatescu
    • 1
  • Robert Goetz
    • 1
  • Terry Wong
    • 2
  • Brian Streich
    • 3
  • Vikas Saraf
    • 4
  • Mike Glavicic
    • 5
  • Don Slavik
    • 6
  • Rajiv Sampath
    • 6
  • Andrew Sharp
    • 6
  • Bill Song
    • 7
  • Pete Bocchini
    • 8
  1. 1.Pratt & WhitneyEast HartfordUSA
  2. 2.Aerojet-RocketdyneCanoga ParkUSA
  3. 3.Honeywell AerospacePhoenixUSA
  4. 4.ATI-ForgingsCudahyUSA
  5. 5.Rolls-Royce CorporationIndianapolisUSA
  6. 6.GE AviationCincinnatiUSA
  7. 7.AFRL/RXCM, Wright-Patterson AFBDaytonUSA
  8. 8.BoeingSt. LouisUSA

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