Social Network Analysis and Mining

, Volume 1, Issue 1, pp 21–26 | Cite as

Social network analysis: developments, advances, and prospects

Original Article

Abstract

This paper reviews the development of social network analysis and examines its major areas of application in sociology. Current developments, including those from outside the social sciences, are examined and their prospects for advances in substantive knowledge are considered. A concluding section looks at the implications of data mining techniques and highlights the need for interdisciplinary cooperation if significant work is to ensue.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of PlymouthPlymouthUK

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