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Are We Forgetting Sati? Memory and the Benefits of Mindfulness from a Non-Buddhist Viewpoint

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Abbreviations

AN + book.sutta number:

Aṅguttara Nikāya, translated by Bodhi (2012)

DN + sutta number:

Dīgha Nikāya, translated by Walshe (1995)

MN + sutta number:

Majjhima Nikāya, translated by Ñanamoli and Bodhi (2015)

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Mattes, J. Are We Forgetting Sati? Memory and the Benefits of Mindfulness from a Non-Buddhist Viewpoint. Mindfulness 10, 1703–1706 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-019-01158-y

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