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The Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire: Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version

Abstract

We investigated the psychometric properties of a Chinese version of Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) in a non-clinical student sample. The Chinese FFMQ demonstrated acceptable internal consistency and the test-retest reliability. Confirmatory factor analysis provided support for the five-factor model. Four of these facets (describing, acting with awareness, non-judging and non-reacting) were shown to have incremental validity in the prediction of depression and anxiety. Our findings suggest that the Chinese version of the FFMQ has acceptable psychometric properties and is a valid instrument for the assessment of mindfulness.

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Acknowledgements

This research was supported by the National Science Foundation of China (Project No.30900411) and the Grant from the Beijing Special Fund of Outstanding Personnel Training (2009D005016000012). This research was also partly supported by the Beijing Key Laboratory of Learning and Cognition, Capital Normal University. The authors would like to acknowledge Han Kai-Lei, Li Li-Juan, Li Mi, Wang Si-Si, and Zhang Hong-Bao who are the graduates in Psychology Department in Capital Normal University for their assistance with data collection.

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Correspondence to Xing-Hua Liu.

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Deng, YQ., Liu, XH., Rodriguez, M.A. et al. The Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire: Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version. Mindfulness 2, 123–128 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-011-0050-9

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Keywords

  • Mindfulness
  • Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ)
  • Reliability
  • Validity