The journal of nutrition, health & aging

, Volume 17, Issue 5, pp 456–460 | Cite as

Low vitamin and carotenoid levels are related to cerebral white matter lesions

  • Y. Ohshima
  • Toshiki Mizuno
  • K. Yamada
  • S. Matsumoto
  • Y. Nagakane
  • M. Kondo
  • N. Kuriyama
  • T. Miyazaki
  • K. Takeda
  • T. Nishimura
  • M. Nakagawa
  • K. Ozasa
  • Y. Watanabe
Article

Abstract

Objectives: Purpose

To determine the effects of vitamins and carotenoids on brain white matter lesions (WMLs), we examined the associations between WMLs with vitamin and carotenoid levels in Japanese middle-aged and elderly subjects.

Subjects and methods

Four-hundred and sixty-nine healthy participants (male = 317; female = 152) that underwent medical examinations were examined. Deep white matter lesions (DWLs) were detected via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 39 subjects. We evaluated the effects of vitamin and carotenoid levels on DWLs via logistic regression analysis.

Results

Lower gamma-tocopherol levels were significantly associated with DWLs in all subjects. While lower gamma-tocopherol and vitamin C levels were significantly associated with DWLs in males, lower delta-tocopherol levels were associated with DWLs in females. The associations between DWLs and lower gamma- and delta-tocopherol and vitamin C levels were independent of age, hypertension, or smoking. However, the associations between DWLs and lower alfatocopherol were not significant following adjustments for smoking.

Conclusion

Lower carotenoid and vitamin levels were independently associated with cerebral DWLs in Japanese subjects.

Key words

Vitamin carotenoid magnetic resonance imaging white matter lesion cerebral ischemia 

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Copyright information

© Serdi and Springer-Verlag France 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Ohshima
    • 1
  • Toshiki Mizuno
    • 1
    • 6
  • K. Yamada
    • 3
  • S. Matsumoto
    • 4
  • Y. Nagakane
    • 1
  • M. Kondo
    • 1
  • N. Kuriyama
    • 1
  • T. Miyazaki
    • 4
  • K. Takeda
    • 4
  • T. Nishimura
    • 3
  • M. Nakagawa
    • 1
  • K. Ozasa
    • 2
    • 5
  • Y. Watanabe
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Neurology and GerontologyKyoto Prefectural University of MedicineKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Epidemiology for Community Health and MedicineKyoto Prefectural University of MedicineKyotoJapan
  3. 3.Department of RadiologyKyoto Prefectural University of MedicineKyotoJapan
  4. 4.Kyoto Industrial Health AssociationKyotoJapan
  5. 5.Department of EpidemiologyRadiation Effects Research FoundationHiroshimaJapan
  6. 6.KyotoJapan

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